IPW2017 - International Pectinid Workshop text on image of scallop shells.

 

The workshop will focus on six main topics:

  • Aquaculture
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Physiology
  • Biotoxins, Pollution and Contamination
  • Ecology and Climate Change
  • Fisheries
  • Resource management

Abstract Preparation & Submission Guidelines

Submission Deadline:15th January, 2019

Abstracts should be concisely written and be submitted as follows:

  • Authors are required to upload the manuscript as Microsoft Word file (.doc or .docx).
  • Set margins at 3 cm, top, bottom and sides. Abstract should be no longer than TWO pages in length (including any graphs and figures).
  • Use Arial font. Character size: Title, 14, bold and centred. Type title in upper and lower case, standard title format.  Authors, affiliations, email and text at a size of 12 points.
  • Presenting author in bold. Group authors by affiliation. Type affiliation below author lines. Include ONLY the affiliation name, city, state and country in abstract listing.
  • Type body single spaced without any indents or tabs. Double space between paragraphs.
  • Apply bolding, italics, underlining, superscripts and subscripts in your main text as you want to appear in your final abstract.
  • Full main address at the bottom of the abstract and email address of the corresponding author.
  • Figures and tables will only be printed in grey scale, be sure that all features are clearly legible, high resolution
  • All abstracts should be written in English. The Abstract File Name must contain your first and last name as in the following example: "Pectin_Fondler_Abstract.docx"
  • Your abstract will be reviewed by the Organising Committee and you will be informed about the acceptance of it shortly after submission.
  • All student presentations, both oral and poster, will be entered into the Student Presentation Competition (Student must be the first author and presenter).
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IPW2017 - International Pectinid Workshop text on image of scallop shells.
Example Abstract: Links between morphology and behaviour in scallops with different swimming styles (12 point Arial font) Isabelle Tremblay1 and Helga E. Guderley2 (12 point Arial font) 1 Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; 2 Resources Aquatiques Quebec, Institue des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada (10 point Arial font) email: enter corresponding author address Scallops differentiate themselves from other bivalves by their swimming capacities. Modifications in shell structure, mantle and adductor muscle are considered derived adaptations that allowed scallops to swim. Swimming capacity is shared by scallops exhibiting a wide range of shell morphologies and life styles ranging from the highly active Amusium balloti to the byssally attached Mimachlamys asperrima. Logically, the swimming ability of bivalves should be reflected in their morphological characteristics, including adductor muscle size and position and shell characteristics. Several studies have compared shell and adductor muscle morphology in swimming and non-swimming monomyarian bivalves, inferring swimming abilities from the literature. However, the literature does not reveal whether differences in shell and muscle morphology are quantitatively linked with the wide range of scallop swimming strategies. Various morphological characteristics of the shell (mass, aspect ratio and volume between the valves) and the adductor muscle (size, position and arrangement in the shell) were measured in 5 scallop species (Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus, Pecten fumatus, Mimachlamys asperrima, and Crassadoma gigantea) with distinct escape responses, as documented by measurements of muscle use during escape responses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on these morphological characteristics to examine the links among them and how they differentiated the experimental species. Next, PCA were carried out on the data for patterns of muscle use during escape responses (Tremblay et al. 2012) to evaluate links among the principal components describing morphology and those describing behaviour. Morphological characteristics of the shell and adductor muscle differed markedly between the species, but did not always follow their swimming strategies. The PCA for the morphological characteristics yielded three principal components (mass and proportions, force and size, obliqueness and aspect ratio) that together accounted for 61% of the variance. The PCA for behavioural parameters yielded two principal components (endurance and intensity of the escape response) that explained 70% of the variability in the data. Integrating the results from the two principal components analyses revealed that shell width, shell and muscle masses, and related morphological attributes were closely linked with swimming endurance. The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle. The relationship between scallop behaviour and morphology is not simple, as it is the result of compromises imposed by the habitats, lifestyle and predators. To understand how the combinations of morphological parameters relate to the swimming behaviour of each species, it is important to interpret these results in the overall context of the habitats in which these scallops live.
IPW2017 - International Pectinid Workshop text on image of scallop shells.
Example Abstract: Links between morphology and behaviour in scallops with different swimming styles (12 point Arial font) Isabelle Tremblay1 and Helga E. Guderley2 (12 point Arial font) 1 Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; 2 Resources Aquatiques Quebec, Institue des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada (10 point Arial font) email: enter corresponding author address Scallops differentiate themselves from other bivalves by their swimming capacities. Modifications in shell structure, mantle and adductor muscle are considered derived adaptations that allowed scallops to swim. Swimming capacity is shared by scallops exhibiting a wide range of shell morphologies and life styles ranging from the highly active Amusium balloti to the byssally attached Mimachlamys asperrima. Logically, the swimming ability of bivalves should be reflected in their morphological characteristics, including adductor muscle size and position and shell characteristics. Several studies have compared shell and adductor muscle morphology in swimming and non-swimming monomyarian bivalves, inferring swimming abilities from the literature. However, the literature does not reveal whether differences in shell and muscle morphology are quantitatively linked with the wide range of scallop swimming strategies. Various morphological characteristics of the shell (mass, aspect ratio and volume between the valves) and the adductor muscle (size, position and arrangement in the shell) were measured in 5 scallop species (Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus, Pecten fumatus, Mimachlamys asperrima, and Crassadoma gigantea) with distinct escape responses, as documented by measurements of muscle use during escape responses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on these morphological characteristics to examine the links among them and how they differentiated the experimental species. Next, PCA were carried out on the data for patterns of muscle use during escape responses (Tremblay et al. 2012) to evaluate links among the principal components describing morphology and those describing behaviour. Morphological characteristics of the shell and adductor muscle differed markedly between the species, but did not always follow their swimming strategies. The PCA for the morphological characteristics yielded three principal components (mass and proportions, force and size, obliqueness and aspect ratio) that together accounted for 61% of the variance. The PCA for behavioural parameters yielded two principal components (endurance and intensity of the escape response) that explained 70% of the variability in the data. Integrating the results from the two principal components analyses revealed that shell width, shell and muscle masses, and related morphological attributes were closely linked with swimming endurance. The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle. The relationship between scallop behaviour and morphology is not simple, as it is the result of compromises imposed by the habitats, lifestyle and predators. To understand how the combinations of morphological parameters relate to the swimming behaviour of each species, it is important to interpret these results in the overall context of the habitats in which these scallops live.
Example Abstract: Links between morphology and behaviour in scallops with different swimming styles (12 point Arial font) Isabelle Tremblay1 and Helga E. Guderley2 (12 point Arial font) 1 Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; 2 Resources Aquatiques Quebec, Institue des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada (10 point Arial font) email: enter corresponding author address Scallops differentiate themselves from other bivalves by their swimming capacities. Modifications in shell structure, mantle and adductor muscle are considered derived adaptations that allowed scallops to swim. Swimming capacity is shared by scallops exhibiting a wide range of shell morphologies and life styles ranging from the highly active Amusium balloti to the byssally attached Mimachlamys asperrima. Logically, the swimming ability of bivalves should be reflected in their morphological characteristics, including adductor muscle size and position and shell characteristics. Several studies have compared shell and adductor muscle morphology in swimming and non-swimming monomyarian bivalves, inferring swimming abilities from the literature. However, the literature does not reveal whether differences in shell and muscle morphology are quantitatively linked with the wide range of scallop swimming strategies. Various morphological characteristics of the shell (mass, aspect ratio and volume between the valves) and the adductor muscle (size, position and arrangement in the shell) were measured in 5 scallop species (Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus, Pecten fumatus, Mimachlamys asperrima, and Crassadoma gigantea) with distinct escape responses, as documented by measurements of muscle use during escape responses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on these morphological characteristics to examine the links among them and how they differentiated the experimental species. Next, PCA were carried out on the data for patterns of muscle use during escape responses (Tremblay et al. 2012) to evaluate links among the principal components describing morphology and those describing behaviour. Morphological characteristics of the shell and adductor muscle differed markedly between the species, but did not always follow their swimming strategies. The PCA for the morphological characteristics yielded three principal components (mass and proportions, force and size, obliqueness and aspect ratio) that together accounted for 61% of the variance. The PCA for behavioural parameters yielded two principal components (endurance and intensity of the escape response) that explained 70% of the variability in the data. Integrating the results from the two principal components analyses revealed that shell width, shell and muscle masses, and related morphological attributes were closely linked with swimming endurance. The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle. The relationship between scallop behaviour and morphology is not simple, as it is the result of compromises imposed by the habitats, lifestyle and predators. To understand how the combinations of morphological parameters relate to the swimming behaviour of each species, it is important to interpret these results in the overall context of the habitats in which these scallops live.
IPW2017 - International Pectinid Workshop text on image of scallop shells.
Example Abstract: Links between morphology and behaviour in scallops with different swimming styles (12 point Arial font) Isabelle Tremblay1 and Helga E. Guderley2 (12 point Arial font) 1 Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; 2 Resources Aquatiques Quebec, Institue des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada (10 point Arial font) email: enter corresponding author address Scallops differentiate themselves from other bivalves by their swimming capacities. Modifications in shell structure, mantle and adductor muscle are considered derived adaptations that allowed scallops to swim. Swimming capacity is shared by scallops exhibiting a wide range of shell morphologies and life styles ranging from the highly active Amusium balloti to the byssally attached Mimachlamys asperrima. Logically, the swimming ability of bivalves should be reflected in their morphological characteristics, including adductor muscle size and position and shell characteristics. Several studies have compared shell and adductor muscle morphology in swimming and non-swimming monomyarian bivalves, inferring swimming abilities from the literature. However, the literature does not reveal whether differences in shell and muscle morphology are quantitatively linked with the wide range of scallop swimming strategies. Various morphological characteristics of the shell (mass, aspect ratio and volume between the valves) and the adductor muscle (size, position and arrangement in the shell) were measured in 5 scallop species (Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus, Pecten fumatus, Mimachlamys asperrima, and Crassadoma gigantea) with distinct escape responses, as documented by measurements of muscle use during escape responses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on these morphological characteristics to examine the links among them and how they differentiated the experimental species. Next, PCA were carried out on the data for patterns of muscle use during escape responses (Tremblay et al. 2012) to evaluate links among the principal components describing morphology and those describing behaviour. Morphological characteristics of the shell and adductor muscle differed markedly between the species, but did not always follow their swimming strategies. The PCA for the morphological characteristics yielded three principal components (mass and proportions, force and size, obliqueness and aspect ratio) that together accounted for 61% of the variance. The PCA for behavioural parameters yielded two principal components (endurance and intensity of the escape response) that explained 70% of the variability in the data. Integrating the results from the two principal components analyses revealed that shell width, shell and muscle masses, and related morphological attributes were closely linked with swimming endurance. The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle. The relationship between scallop behaviour and morphology is not simple, as it is the result of compromises imposed by the habitats, lifestyle and predators. To understand how the combinations of morphological parameters relate to the swimming behaviour of each species, it is important to interpret these results in the overall context of the habitats in which these scallops live.
IPW2017 - International Pectinid Workshop text on image of scallop shells.
Example Abstract: Links between morphology and behaviour in scallops with different swimming styles (12 point Arial font) Isabelle Tremblay1 and Helga E. Guderley2 (12 point Arial font) 1 Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; 2 Resources Aquatiques Quebec, Institue des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada (10 point Arial font) email: enter corresponding author address Scallops differentiate themselves from other bivalves by their swimming capacities. Modifications in shell structure, mantle and adductor muscle are considered derived adaptations that allowed scallops to swim. Swimming capacity is shared by scallops exhibiting a wide range of shell morphologies and life styles ranging from the highly active Amusium balloti to the byssally attached Mimachlamys asperrima. Logically, the swimming ability of bivalves should be reflected in their morphological characteristics, including adductor muscle size and position and shell characteristics. Several studies have compared shell and adductor muscle morphology in swimming and non-swimming monomyarian bivalves, inferring swimming abilities from the literature. However, the literature does not reveal whether differences in shell and muscle morphology are quantitatively linked with the wide range of scallop swimming strategies. Various morphological characteristics of the shell (mass, aspect ratio and volume between the valves) and the adductor muscle (size, position and arrangement in the shell) were measured in 5 scallop species (Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus, Pecten fumatus, Mimachlamys asperrima, and Crassadoma gigantea) with distinct escape responses, as documented by measurements of muscle use during escape responses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on these morphological characteristics to examine the links among them and how they differentiated the experimental species. Next, PCA were carried out on the data for patterns of muscle use during escape responses (Tremblay et al. 2012) to evaluate links among the principal components describing morphology and those describing behaviour. Morphological characteristics of the shell and adductor muscle differed markedly between the species, but did not always follow their swimming strategies. The PCA for the morphological characteristics yielded three principal components (mass and proportions, force and size, obliqueness and aspect ratio) that together accounted for 61% of the variance. The PCA for behavioural parameters yielded two principal components (endurance and intensity of the escape response) that explained 70% of the variability in the data. Integrating the results from the two principal components analyses revealed that shell width, shell and muscle masses, and related morphological attributes were closely linked with swimming endurance. The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle. The relationship between scallop behaviour and morphology is not simple, as it is the result of compromises imposed by the habitats, lifestyle and predators. To understand how the combinations of morphological parameters relate to the swimming behaviour of each species, it is important to interpret these results in the overall context of the habitats in which these scallops live.
IPW2017 - International Pectinid Workshop text on image of scallop shells.
Example Abstract: Links between morphology and behaviour in scallops with different swimming styles (12 point Arial font) Isabelle Tremblay1 and Helga E. Guderley2 (12 point Arial font) 1 Departement de Biologie, Universite Laval, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada; 2 Resources Aquatiques Quebec, Institue des sciences de la mer de Rimouski, Universite du Quebec a Rimouski, Rimouski, Quebec, Canada (10 point Arial font) email: enter corresponding author address Scallops differentiate themselves from other bivalves by their swimming capacities. Modifications in shell structure, mantle and adductor muscle are considered derived adaptations that allowed scallops to swim. Swimming capacity is shared by scallops exhibiting a wide range of shell morphologies and life styles ranging from the highly active Amusium balloti to the byssally attached Mimachlamys asperrima. Logically, the swimming ability of bivalves should be reflected in their morphological characteristics, including adductor muscle size and position and shell characteristics. Several studies have compared shell and adductor muscle morphology in swimming and non-swimming monomyarian bivalves, inferring swimming abilities from the literature. However, the literature does not reveal whether differences in shell and muscle morphology are quantitatively linked with the wide range of scallop swimming strategies. Various morphological characteristics of the shell (mass, aspect ratio and volume between the valves) and the adductor muscle (size, position and arrangement in the shell) were measured in 5 scallop species (Amusium balloti, Placopecten magellanicus, Pecten fumatus, Mimachlamys asperrima, and Crassadoma gigantea) with distinct escape responses, as documented by measurements of muscle use during escape responses. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on these morphological characteristics to examine the links among them and how they differentiated the experimental species. Next, PCA were carried out on the data for patterns of muscle use during escape responses (Tremblay et al. 2012) to evaluate links among the principal components describing morphology and those describing behaviour. Morphological characteristics of the shell and adductor muscle differed markedly between the species, but did not always follow their swimming strategies. The PCA for the morphological characteristics yielded three principal components (mass and proportions, force and size, obliqueness and aspect ratio) that together accounted for 61% of the variance. The PCA for behavioural parameters yielded two principal components (endurance and intensity of the escape response) that explained 70% of the variability in the data. Integrating the results from the two principal components analyses revealed that shell width, shell and muscle masses, and related morphological attributes were closely linked with swimming endurance. The intensity of the escape response was best predicted by the aspect ratio and the obliqueness of the adductor muscle. The relationship between scallop behaviour and morphology is not simple, as it is the result of compromises imposed by the habitats, lifestyle and predators. To understand how the combinations of morphological parameters relate to the swimming behaviour of each species, it is important to interpret these results in the overall context of the habitats in which these scallops live.